Leigh Extence | 01395 268723 | 07967 802160 | leigh@extence.co.uk

Drocourt, Paris - A Finely Engraved Carriage Clock with Porcelain Panels

A finely engraved cannalée carriage clock with painted porcelain panels and dial. The eight-day duration movement strikes the hours and half-hours on a gong, with a push button repeat and has a silvered platform lever escapement. The backplate is stamped with the Drocourt trademark, the initials D.C. either side of a clock, along with the serial number 13473. The two side panels depict courting couples, one side showing a farm hand talking to a maid who is drawing water from a well, whilst the other panel depicts a more well-to-do boy talking with a well dressed young lady in a country house garden; the dial is painted with a rural scene depicting a farm cottage with geese and a woman walking and has black Roman hour numerals, blued steel spade hands and is signed for Tiffany & Co, Paris, one of the leading jewellers and silversmiths in America at this time and obviously made to be retailed in that country at their New York showrooms. They could be considered competitors to the other fine jewellers of the period, J.E. Caldwell of Philadelphia, who were also supplied carriage clocks by Drocourt. The cannalée case is beautifully engraved in floral and rococo decoration on a matted ground, typical of the best seen on Drocourt clocks, and has a three bail handle. With original numbered key. Height: 5¾ inches (14.5 cms): handle down: 7 inches (18 cms): handle up Please click on images to enlarge: Any additional images are shown below

Pierre and Alfred Drocourt

Pierre Drocourt, born 1819 & his son Alfred, born 1847, were one of the top maker's of carriage clocks in the mid to late Victorian period, having a factory at Saint-Nicolas-d'Aliermont, the most important town for carriage clock manufacture at the time, as well as premises in Paris at Rue Debelleyme 28, previously named Rue de Limoges prior to 1867, where he joined the well-known maker Blanpain. They made superb carriage clocks which were often decorative and were awarded numerous medals at exhibitions, such as the Bronze Medal at Paris 1867, the Silver at Paris 1878 and the gold at Paris in 1889. Alfred succeeded his father Pierre in circa 1871, with the latter’s retirement when he returned to his home village with his wife Marie and daughter Melanie. For further details on the Drocourt family and their clocks, see my 2014 Exhibition catalogue available to view from the catalogue section above, where there is a summary of my research.      

Price: Reserved

Ref: 1419

Additional Images

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Leigh Extence | 01395 268723 | 07967 802160 | email: leigh@extence.co.uk
Leigh Extence Fine Antique Clocks Home Clocks for Sale Valuations News Catalogues About Leigh Extence Contact

Drocourt, Paris - A Finely Engraved Carriage Clock with Porcelain Panels

A finely engraved cannalée carriage clock with painted porcelain panels and dial. The eight- day duration movement strikes the hours and half-hours on a gong, with a push button repeat and has a silvered platform lever escapement. The backplate is stamped with the Drocourt trademark, the initials D.C. either side of a clock, along with the serial number 13473. The two side panels depict courting couples, one side showing a farm hand talking to a maid who is drawing water from a well, whilst the other panel depicts a more well-to-do boy talking with a well dressed young lady in a country house garden; the dial is painted with a rural scene depicting a farm cottage with geese and a woman walking and has black Roman hour numerals, blued steel spade hands and is signed for Tiffany & Co, Paris, one of the leading jewellers and silversmiths in America at this time and obviously made to be retailed in that country at their New York showrooms. They could be considered competitors to the other fine jewellers of the period, J.E. Caldwell of Philadelphia, who were also supplied carriage clocks by Drocourt. The cannalée case is beautifully engraved in floral and rococo decoration on a matted ground, typical of the best seen on Drocourt clocks, and has a three bail handle. With original numbered key. Height: 5¾ inches (14.5 cms): handle down: 7 inches (18 cms): handle up Please click on images to enlarge: Any additional images are shown below

Pierre & Alfred Drocourt

Pierre Drocourt, born 1819 & his son Alfred, born 1847, were one of the top maker's of carriage clocks in the mid to late Victorian period, having a factory at Saint-Nicolas- d'Aliermont, the most important town for carriage clock manufacture at the time, as well as premises in Paris at Rue Debelleyme 28; previously named Rue de Limoges prior to 1867, where he joined the well-known maker Blanpain. They made superb carriage clocks which were often decorative and were awarded numerous medals at exhibitions, such as the Bronze Medal at Paris 1867, the Silver at Paris 1878 and the gold at Paris in 1889. Alfred succeeded his father Pierre in circa 1871, with the latter’s retirement when he returned to his home village with his wife Marie and daughter Melanie. For further details on the Drocourt family and their clocks, see my 2014 Exhibition catalogue available to view from the catalogue section above, where there is a summary of my research. 

Price: Reserved

Ref: 1419

Additional Images